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EarthPy: A Python package that makes it easier to explore and plot raster and vector data using open source Python tools

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luizirber
21 hours ago
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Hey! This is the first fast-tracked JOSS paper coming from pyOpenSci, and I was the editor there =)
Davis, CA
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23-08-2018

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luizirber
22 hours ago
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14-08-2018

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vitormazzi
3 days ago
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Brasil
luizirber
3 days ago
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Davis, CA
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Frog Prince

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The really gross part is when she puts her lips to the roasted frog to eat it and it turns into Prince Charming.

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luizirber
7 days ago
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Davis, CA
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A Few Ideas from Economist Peter Bernstein

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I found all kinds of wisdom in this interview with economist Peter Bernstein. It was originally published in 2004 and the updated online a couple of years ago. A lot of the wisdom sounds familiar, as most general wisdom does, but occasionally Bernstein offers a twist. For instance, I like this passage:

I make no excuses or apologies for changing my mind. The world around me changes, for one thing, but also I am continuously learning. I have never finished my education and probably never will.... I'm always telling myself, "I must sit down and explain why I said this, and why I was wrong."

People often speak the virtue of changing our minds, but Bernstein goes further: he feels a need to explain both the reason he thought what he did and the reason he was wrong. That sort of post-mortem can be immensely helpful to the rest of us as we try to learn, and the humility of explaining the error keeps us all better grounded.

I found quotable passages on almost every page. One quoted Leibniz, which I paraphrased as:

von Leibniz told Bernoulli that nature works in patterns, but "only for the most part". The other part -- the unpredictable part -- tends to be where the action is.

Poking around the fringes of a model that is pretty good or a pattern of thought that only occasionally fails us often brings surprising opportunities for advancement.

Many of Bernstein's ideas were framed specifically as about investing, of course, such as:

The riskiest moment is when you're right. That's when you're in the most trouble, because you tend to overstay the good decisions.

and:

Diversification is not only a survival strategy but also an aggressive strategy, because the next windfall might come from a surprising place.

These ideas are powerful outside the financial world, too, though. Investing too much importance in a productive research area can be risky because it becomes easy to stay there too long after the world starts to move away. Diversifying our programming language skills and toolsets might look like a conservative strategy that limits rapid advance in a research niche right now, but it also equips us to adapt more quickly when the next big idea happens somewhere we don't expect.

Anyway, the interview is a good long-but-quick read. There's plenty more to consider, in particular his application of Pascal's wager to general decision making. Give it a read if it sounds interesting.

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luizirber
14 days ago
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Davis, CA
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I'm the Googlebot. I'm here to index you. Please hold still.

jwz
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"They said to target homeless people because they're the least likely to say anything to the media."

Teams were dispatched to target homeless people in Atlanta, unsuspecting students on college campuses around the U.S. and attendees of the BET Awards festivities in Los Angeles, among other places. [...] Project leaders specifically told the TVCs to go after people of color, conceal the fact that people's faces were being recorded and even lie to maximize their data collections. [...]

"We were told not to tell (people) that it was video, even though it would say on the screen that a video was taken," a source said, adding that video of each user was stored under each TVC's profile and periodically reviewed in performance meetings.

"If the person were to look at that screen after the task had been completed, and say, 'Oh, was it taking a video?'... we were instructed to say, 'Oh it's not really,'" the source said. [...]

TVCs were encouraged to rush subjects through survey questions and a consent agreement and walk away if people started to get suspicious, the for-hire workers said. [...] "Basically distract them and say anything. 'Just go ahead and hit the next button. Don't even worry about that.' That kind of stuff. Really just move it along. 'Let's go. Hit all the next buttons,'" the former temp said, snapping his fingers for emphasis. [...]

"They said to target homeless people because they're the least likely to say anything to the media," the ex-staffer said. "The homeless people didn't know what was going on at all." [...] The manager spoke to the TVCs going to Atlanta and stressed that the company is "trying to target darker skin people." [...]

An image of the agreement appears to give Google vast leeway with the face data. It says Google could keep the scans "as long as needed to fulfill the purposes which is expected to be about five years." Perhaps most unsettling, the consent agreement gave Google the right to "retain, use or share non-personally identifying or aggregate data without limitation for any purpose," and said the data could be processed "outside the country," including places "where you may have fewer rights."

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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vitormazzi
16 days ago
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Brasil
luizirber
16 days ago
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1 public comment
mkalus
16 days ago
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“Don’t be Evil”. Umm, yeah. I guess it was always more aspirational than anything else, eh Google?
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